Book vs. Film: The Hunger Games

book vs film The Hunger Games

Book (by a whisker).

  • The language was clever in the book – lost its impact in the movie.
  • Surprisingly, I felt more suspense in the book than the movie (unexpected).
  • But the cinematic scenes in the book (such as when the tributes were introduced) were brilliant on the screen.

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins.

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Top Ten Tuesday – Books to Get in the Halloween Spirit

At the risk of being black-listed by The Broke and the Bookish crowd, I’m admitting that I have no real interest in books about vampires. Or witches. Or anything para-normal. Yes, I did read the Twilight series (because I like a book with hype) and I did enjoy it but it hasn’t gone further than that. So I’m likely to fail miserably at this week’s top ten topic –  Top Ten Books to Get in the Halloween Spirit.

So whilst there’s nothing terribly ghoulish or fitting for Halloween on my list, here’s the ten books that scared the pants off me (for all sorts of reasons) – Continue reading

‘The Hunger Games’ by Suzanne Collins

There are a million reviews of The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins and you’d have to be living under a rock to have avoided hearing about the movie, which is out now.

It’s the story of sixteen-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who lives in a post-apocalyptic world in the fictional country of Panem where the countries of North America once existed. The Capitol, a highly advanced metropolis, holds absolute power over the rest of the nation, which is divided into twelve districts. The Hunger Games are an annual event in which one boy and one girl aged 12 to 18 from each district are selected by lottery to compete in a televised battle in which only one person can survive. The ‘winner’ secures glory and food for their district.

I found The Hunger Games compelling reading but in addition, it got me thinking – not so much about the book itself but about the ‘genre’ that it has been put in. I saw the movie trailer for The Hunger Games when I was at Breaking Dawn* in November 2011 (no, I’m not a Twi-hard but I can answer the question “Are you on Team Edward or Team Jacob?”). I hadn’t heard of The Hunger Games at that point but later downloaded the book onto my Kindle (it’s always book first, movie second for me). Continue reading

A bad run…

My Twitter hash tag to accompany #reading of late has been #4shitbooksandcounting – seriously, is my bad book run penance for the glorious Baxter, Tiffany and Hartnet weeks?!

One of my Twitter pals wisely suggested re-reading some old favourites to break the spell – good idea. I may have to turn to some character-rich Henry James or some sentimental John Irving to get back on track.

At the risk of a new hash tag, #5shitbooksandcounting, I’m going to quickly read The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins to see what all the fuss is about. If that’s not reasonable, it will be ‘Hello Irving and James’!

What do you do when you have a bad run of books?

PS. The picture above is of a sculpture made from 25,000 Dr. Seuss Books for the New York Public Library – I love it.

Reading stack confessions…

The latest Readings newsletter arrived in my letterbox this week. I dare not open it because I know I’ll find reviews and snippets about all sorts of good books that I haven’t yet read.

My pile of books waiting to be read (both physical and ‘virtual’) is embarrassingly huge. In fact, if I didn’t buy another book for two years, I would probably have enough to read. I keep making vague pledges to stop adding to the stack but then I read about a new book – for example Novel Girl’s interview with author Eowyn Ivey about her debut novel, The Snow Child – and my resolution disappears.

So here are the hard facts about my reading stack – 144 titles sitting on my Kindle (*blush*) and 47 unread books on the shelf (*blushes again*). That’s actually about three years worth of reading. Lordy.

What’s ahead? Well The Snow Child of course, The Freudian Slip by Marion von Adlerstein, A Common Loss by Kirsten Tranter, 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami and I’ll probably cave and read The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins – those and 186 other books!