Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

1. There’s so much I love about this I hardly know where to begin. How about I just share my favourite quote from the article – “One thing that really divides Norway is bark.”

2. And there’s a book coming. #ALLTHEMEN I know are getting this book for upcoming birthdays/ Christmas.

lars-mytting-norwegian-wood

3. All this talk of open fires reminds me of one of my favourite sayings (that I break out while watching my husband and brother build stupidly big fires) – “The bigger the fire, the bigger the fool.” Continue reading

Doppler by Erlend Loe

I live in Melbourne, a place that is frequently listed as one of the world’s most liveable cities. Yet if I think about the poster-child for modern living, the honours go to Scandinavian countries with their superior public health, education, childcare and aged-care systems. I’m quite sure that climate is what drags Scandinavian cities down when it comes to ‘liveability’ (notably, cost of living is generally excluded from liveability indexes).

With this in mind, meet Andreas Doppler – he’s living the Norwegian dream – wife and two children, good job, nice house in Oslo. One day Doppler is cycling (on his flash mountain bike) through the forest, when he crashes. Lying on the forest floor amongst the heather, Doppler has an epiphany – he doesn’t like people, and he thinks he may also have unresolved issues regarding his father’s death. So doing what really only wealthy-upper-middle-class-hipsters can afford to do, Doppler leaves his family and goes to live in the forest. In a tent. With an elk named Bongo. Continue reading

First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday – ‘Doppler’ by Erlend Loe

doppler-erlend-loe

First Chapter, First Paragraph Tuesday is hosted by Diane at Bibliophile by the Sea – it’s is a weekly meme where you share the first paragraph (or two) from a book you are considering reading.

I picked up Doppler by Erland Loe because I loved the cover, I loved its compact size (this is a book you want to slip reassuringly into your dressing-gown pocket), and because I haven’t read anything Norwegian yet for the Translation reading challenge.

It begins – Continue reading