Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

01. Woohoo. I finally got Cloud of the Day (for the Mamma cloud above). Continue reading

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Six Degrees of Separation – from Pride and Prejudice to Swing Time

It’s time for #6degrees. Join in and thrill us with your clever links!

Given that we’ve recently marked 200 years since Jane Austen’s death, it seemed fitting to begin this month’s chain with the universally loved Pride and  Prejudice. Continue reading

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

01. Are we excited about the Man Booker 2017 longlist? I’ve read two (Exit West – didn’t like it much at all; Swing Time – loved some bits, other bits not so much) and have one more in the reading pile (The Underground Railroad). I’m intrigued by 4 3 2 1 and Lincoln in the Bardo. Tell me who you think will win and I’ll endeavour to read those before it’s announced so I can feel smug about being ahead of the curve 🙂 Continue reading

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

01. Yesterday I went to Sydney to be part of the studio audience for the ABC’s The Book Clubindulgent, yes, and so much fun (spoiler: the panel ALL AGREES ON A BOOK!).

02. I didn’t have much time in Sydney other than that spent at the ABC Studio, although I did squeeze in a quick walk this morning. And I thought that people who live in Sydney must suck at cloud-spotting… (remember, it’s winter here).

sydney-1 Continue reading

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

miffy-jumper

01. I’ve mentioned how much I love Miffy, right? This.

02. The Melbourne Writers Festival 2016 program was announced yesterday. Tickets go on sale tomorrow, which gives me a few more hours to sort out how I’ll manage #ALLTHEEVENTS (on my radar are Shriver, Flanagan, Tsiolkas, Wood, Garner, Funder, Earls, Beneba Clarke). Continue reading

The Narrow Road to the Deep North by Richard Flanagan

the-narrow-road-to-the-deep-north-richard-flanagan

If you wanted to test something such as the long-term effects of growing up without enough pop culture* or even the outcome of different schools on a person’s education, you’d quickly discover that there’s no perfect experiment. A life lived without Grease and Ferris versus one that is crammed full of those things plus The Brady Bunch, ABBA, and Flock of Seagulls hair-dos may be just as rich** – who knows? Likewise, it’s impossible to say whether I’ll enjoy a book more or less in an audio format versus a hard copy. So, it was either my ears or my eyes that would first take in Richard Flanagan’s Booker Prize winning epic, The Narrow Road to the Deep North. I went with ears. Continue reading