Lately (Spring edition)

Listening: Podcasts – Teacher’s Pet (gripping, as good as Serial); MDWAP (S4 is heaven on a hat stand); and Slow Burn (a new perspective on the Clinton/ Lewinsky/ Tripp situation) Continue reading

Advertisements

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

01.  Mrs Roth, with her dextrous but controversial Continental knitting style scares the hell out of me.

“…prepare their needles for combat…”
“…something on her needles all the time, from ladies dresses to men’s cardigans…”
“You can tell the temperament of the woman by just how she’s knitting.”

What I want to know – WHO WON?! Continue reading

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

01. I went to a couple of MEL NYC dinners last week. The winner was the Starward Distillery’s whiskey cocktails and ‘street food’ event. Cocktails were spectacular, food delicious and the venue was superb.  Continue reading

A Zoo in my Luggage by Gerald Durrell

I’m always astounded by the television program, Border Security. I’m not interested in the immigration issues or drug busts – it’s the people bringing fruit, vegetables, live seafood and meat into Australia that is fascinating. Invariably, they’re in the ‘nothing to declare’ line when airport officials open their suitcases to find kilos of unidentifiable meat, plants and seeds, and they feign surprise. For my overseas readers, you basically can’t bring ANYTHING into Australia – we have the world’s strictest quarantine and biosecurity laws (remember Johnny Depp’s dogs?).

So it was with a mixture of interest and amazement that I read Gerald Durrell’s memoir, A Zoo in My Luggage. It’s an account of Durrell’s trip to what was then the British Cameroons in West Africa (now part of northern Nigeria and Cameroon), during which he and his wife captured animals to start their own zoo. The book concludes with their return to England, and how he managed his menagerie while he found a permanent home for them (they lived in his back yard and then later in the basement of a department store). Continue reading

The Ice Storm by Rick Moody – a literary mixtape

I loved The Ice Storm by Rick Moody. It’s a brutal, sad story.

There’s not much to like about the characters but there’s lots to like in Moody’s words. This book was extremely visual for me – perhaps because I saw And Lee’s insanely good movie version of the story years ago, or perhaps it’s because Moody has created a distinct sense of place and time. Either way, writing a review wasn’t working so I’ve gone with an audio approach.

I Write the Songs / Barry Manilow

Once his dreams had been songs. He’d been a balladeer of promise and opportunity. Continue reading

Show-off Holiday Post: Sydney

A friend and I have been talking about a weekend in Sydney for about four years – we finally made it happen. When we last travelled to Sydney together it was 1990 and we stayed at a youth hostel, went clubbing every night and recovered during the day. And laughed for a week. We had as many laughs this time but the focus was on fabulous restaurants and cultural activities other than clubbing.

We kicked off our stay with frosè and views at Henry Deane’s. Continue reading