Melbourne Writers Festival 2017 – Day 3

 

Second Generation Narratives

My third day at MWF started with an incredibly impressive panel – Randa Abdel-Fattah, Maxine Beneba Clarke, AS Patrić and Alice Pung (chaired by Arnold Zable) – discussing the second-generation Australian experience and how it’s reflected in literature. Continue reading

Advertisements

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

01. Are we excited about the Man Booker 2017 longlist? I’ve read two (Exit West – didn’t like it much at all; Swing Time – loved some bits, other bits not so much) and have one more in the reading pile (The Underground Railroad). I’m intrigued by 4 3 2 1 and Lincoln in the Bardo. Tell me who you think will win and I’ll endeavour to read those before it’s announced so I can feel smug about being ahead of the curve 🙂 Continue reading

Bad Behaviour by Rebecca Starford

On the back of Tsiolkas’s Barracuda and Pung’s Laurinda (both ‘fictional’) comes Rebecca Starford’s memoir, Bad Behaviour.

Starford recounts her year (at age 14) spent at a school in the bush where she lived in a house with 16 other girls. During her year, Starford experiences bullying (as both a receiver and an instigator) and uses her memoir as a means to explore how this ‘bad behaviour’ impacted her adult relationships.

“…what bothered me the most were all the gaps in the diary. So many things had been left out entirely – arguments, sadness, misbehaviour. On these pages I’d instead pasted in photographs from hikes, to make it look like something else had happened. What, I wondered, was I trying to forget?” Continue reading

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

stella-prize-longlist-2015

1. Stella Prize 2015 longlist announced today. I’ve read four of them (Hartnett, Pung, Garner and Laguna) and have a couple of others in my very-near-reading-future.

2. I’d like to see Hartnett win.

3. But can’t believe Favel Parrett’s When the Night Comes didn’t make the longlist. Continue reading

Laurinda by Alice Pung

I was pleased to open the 2015 reading account with Laurinda by Alice Pung.

Laurinda is the story of Lucy Lam, Chinese-born, but raised for the most part in Australia. Lucy’s parents speak very little English and work extremely hard for minimum (or less) wage. Lucy wins an ‘Equal Access Scholarship’ to the exclusive Laurinda College, an independent school for girls in Melbourne*. Continue reading

Six Degrees of Separation – from The Narrow Road to the Deep North to Laurinda

the-narrow-road-to-the-deep-north-richard-flannagan

It’s time again for my favourite meme. Based on the concept of six degrees of separation, Emma Chapman and Annabel Smith have created #6DEGREES, where bloggers share links between books in six moves. Check out the rules if you want to play along.

This month the chain starts with the 2014 Booker winner, Richard Flanagan’s The Narrow Road to the Deep North. I haven’t read it (yet) but it sits alongside a bunch of other books on a list that I compiled of the books that appear most frequently on all of the Best Books of 2014 lists. Another book on that list that I plan to read is Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi. Continue reading