Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

I think, if they were being brutally honest, most people would give Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman two stars. But you throw an extra star Watchman’s way because it’s Harper Lee. And because we all know those arseholes published this book against her long-held wish.

But I have no qualms about my three star rating because I pulled the right rein and listened to this book. Yes, the words are still the same but when they’re spoken in Reese Witherspoon’s smooth-as-molasses Southern drawl, it’s a very lovely story to hear. Continue reading

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts


01. BEST weekend. Started with ten hours of gin on Saturday – a friend and I went on tour to the Melbourne Gin Company with the Gin Queen. We’re now BFFs with Caroline (the Gin Queen) – you know your people when you meet them – and obviously there will be more gin tours in my future. Continue reading

The Good People by Hannah Kent

The Good People, Hannah Kent’s second novel, tells the story of three women living in a remote Irish valley in 1825. Nora Leahy, a widow, is burdened with the care of her grandson, Michael. The boy cannot walk or speak and Nora has kept him hidden from neighbours, fearing they will believe him a ‘changeling’ (someone who has been abducted by fairies). Nora employs a young girl, Mary, to care for Michael but as the child becomes increasingly difficult to manage, Nora seeks the help of Nance Roche, an old woman known as a doctress –

“The keener. The handy woman… She was both the woman who brought babies to safe harbour in the world, and the siren that cut boats free of their anchors and sent them into the dark.
…she stood in for that which was not and could not be understood. She was the gatekeeper at the edge of the world. The final human hymn before all fell to wind and shadow and the strange creaking of stars. Continue reading

The Stud Book by Monica Drake

The title of Monica Drake’s second novel, The Stud Book, suggests something along the lines of last week’s ‘Oil up, rigs out’ episode of The Bachelorette. Here’s a reminder:


However, it’s anything but. The title is literal – a stud book is a breed registry of animals. The novel is rooted in biology and explores themes of mating and motherhood via a group of friends, who all find themselves at different points on the ‘breeding cycle’. Continue reading

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins – a literary mixtape


There’s more than 75,000 reviews of the best-selling Paula Hawkins thriller, The Girl on the Train on Goodreads. I have nothing to add. Instead, enjoy the tunes (although please note the following: it took all my strength not to include Sheena Easton. And Color Me Badd is everything that’s bad about the nineties). Continue reading