Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

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01. I’ve mentioned how much I love Miffy, right? This.

02. The Melbourne Writers Festival 2016 program was announced yesterday. Tickets go on sale tomorrow, which gives me a few more hours to sort out how I’ll manage #ALLTHEEVENTS (on my radar are Shriver, Flanagan, Tsiolkas, Wood, Garner, Funder, Earls, Beneba Clarke). Continue reading

A Cook’s Tour by Anthony Bourdain

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When it comes to writing about food, Anthony Bourdain pretty much redefined the genre in 2000 with Kitchen Confidential. His rock’n’roll tales from the kitchen were gripping and yet wonderfully repulsive. I’m not sure how he fills his days now, whether it’s behind a grill or a keyboard, but a number of books and documentaries followed Confidential, including my most recent read, A Cook’s Tour. Continue reading

Asking For It by Louise O’Neill

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Louise O’Neill’s novel, Asking For It, is hard-hitting, frightening and all-too-real.

The story opens with a conversation between a group of teenage girls – they’re discussing school, exams, boyfriends and parties – the usual stuff, however it quickly reveals the pecking order among the girls and it’s eighteen year old Emma, who’s on top. Continue reading

You probably didn’t know this about me (or need to know)…

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Book bloggers love posting reviews of books… But it’s the posts about the other stuff that tend to get the most interaction. Or is that just me? Anyway, yesterday’s Top Ten Tuesday topic was not about books but about other random facts. Here’s ten things about me:

01. My Papa taught me how to clear a wave in the surf and then later, how to bodysurf. I still think of him every time I dive under a wave. Continue reading

The Lake House by Kate Morton

When I saw the author Rosalie Ham speak earlier this year, she mentioned that she never reads novels while she is writing one – the reason being, she becomes highly attuned to structure and spots plot tricks everywhere. She used the example of a novel beginning with a husband making mention that he loves his wife – Ham’s first thought is “Well, she’ll be dead by the end of this book!”

I was reminded of Ham’s comment as I slogged through 593 pages of Kate Morton’s The Lake House. It’s a dual mystery, yo-yoing between the 1930s and 2003 – there’s lots of complicating family secrets and missing (possibly dead) people. With Ham’s words in the back of my mind, Morton’s mentions of this, that and the other* were like beacons, alerting me to exactly how things would play out. Continue reading

Bookish (and not so bookish) Thoughts

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01. I mentioned a couple of weeks ago that my 9yo daughter had a ‘to-do’ list. I’m pleased to report that she sat in the car yesterday knitting, blowing bubbles and listening to Cantonese CDs (thanks to my lovely friend, Sam, we’ve got the ‘knitting sticks’ out and we’re both knitting together). Continue reading